Environment & Urbanization

World leading environmental and urban studies journal
E and U April 2016 cover detail

Current issue: From the MDGs to the SDGs and Habitat III

In 2015, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) were replaced by the Sustainable Development Goals. And the UN Conference Habitat III to be held in October 2016 is meant to agree on “the new urban agenda” through which these goals are to be met. This issue of Environment and Urbanization looks critically at whether the much-needed changes in urban policy and practice will be achieved. It includes papers on:

  • what inclusive urbanization actually means (and whether governments will act on it)
  • the rapidly expanding urban agenda but with diminishing expectations for Habitat III
  • the return to large, heavily subsidized and inappropriate mass housing
  • the high rates of return that can come from good urban policy
  • whether we need a new urban agenda for refugees/those displaced by conflict
  • whether urban centres are taken seriously in the post-2015 Agenda
  • indicators that allow cities to measure and monitor their SDG performance
  • missing the MDG targets for water and sanitation in urban areas
  • getting public and environmental health back into urban agendas

Read more...

Book notes

This report uses a problem-driven political economy approach to analyse how the leaders of three mid-sized cities in Vietnam – Can Tho, Quy Nhon and Da Nang – are trying to pursue their urban growth ambitions with increasing awareness of climate change risks.

The purpose of this background paper is to describe recent trends in African urban centres, review potential future trajectories of these, and examine their possible implications for risk accumulation and risk reduction. This paper examines the multiple dimensions of the changing nature of urban centres in Africa, going beyond “urbanization” to look at the broader dimensions of Africa’s “urban revolution”.

Latest blogs

International agencies must support local processes if we are to achieve ambitious global goals – so benefits reach urban communities on the ground whose needs these goals are set up to meet.
Is it possible for global funds to be accountable to local communities – especially those whose needs the funds should address? 
Ten concise points respond to the current draft of Habitat III's New Urban Agenda which is lengthy, dense and gives too little attention to the key roles of local government and civil society.

E&U @SAGE journals

Sister journal

E&U's sister journal  Medio Ambiente y Urbanizacion focusses on Latin America

E & U Latin America