Environment & Urbanization

World leading environmental and urban studies journal

Latest blogs

Urban centres can be among the world's most healthy places to live and work – but many are among the least. How healthy they are is powerfully influenced by local government competence, local information, and support for local action.

For the billion urban dwellers living in informal settlements, there are many risks. Those who are more susceptible to these risks, or less able to cope, are termed vulnerable. But they are not vulnerable if the risks are removed. We need to focus more on removing the risks and less on endless lists of 'vulnerable groups', argues David Satterthwaite.

Whose lives are most at risk in urban areas of the global South – for instance from preventable diseases and disasters? And what are the most serious risks they face?

An index from 2001 needs updating to reflect how policies championed by US President-elect Trump threaten global ecological sustainability.

Jockin Arputham, the president of Slum/Shack Dwellers International and founder of the National Slum Dwellers Federation in India, explains how data from slums, gathered by slum dwellers themselves, is helping to provide vital services where they are needed most.

A new report suggests that most of the world's largest cities in 2100 will be in Africa – including many with over 40 million inhabitants. This blog suggests growth in numbers will hinge more on the extent of economic development.

Population predictions for the world's largest cities in the 21st century (part 2): New figures show the population of the world's largest cities set to soar. This rapid growth calls for better, more sustainable cities.

Population predictions for the world's largest cities in the 21st century (part 1): rapid urbanisation, if managed sustainably, could ease the pressure of exponential growth set for urban areas.

International agencies must support local processes if we are to achieve ambitious global goals – so benefits reach urban communities on the ground whose needs these goals are set up to meet.

Is it possible for global funds to be accountable to local communities – especially those whose needs the funds should address? 

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